Logan holds two graduations

The graduates of Logan High School begin to toss their caps in the air as part of a time-honored tradition at the end of Saturday’s commencement ceremony in Logan.

The graduates of Logan High School begin to toss their caps in the air as part of a time-honored
tradition at the end of Saturday’s commencement ceremony in Logan.

Thomas Garcia

QCS Senior Writer

The were two commencement ceremonies held on Saturday at Logan High School, the first was for the online course featuring the largest graduating class in program history.

Having 14 graduates earn their diplomas is a testament to how successful the program has been since its start four and a half years ago, said Anna Hibner, program director.

The program was started in 2011 by then-Logan Superintendent Ricky Hazen and Hibner, and it gives teens the opportunity to graduate a year early and adults who are not willing to settle for a GED a second chance at high school diploma.

Hibner said the course uses online curriculum from the Global Students Network. She said the students have one lesson per week for 36 weeks to earn a year’s worth of credit. She said this year’s graduates each had personal obstacles that they had to overcome.

“Everyone at one point or another wanted to be a super hero, whisking in to save the day, flying around the world and inspiring people,” said Dennis Roch, Logan superintendent.

Roch said he could remember jumping off the fence while wearing a towel around his neck. He said he learned when he hit the ground that he could not fly like a super hero.

“Although I didn’t fly, that didn’t stop me from getting back up and one day soaring to new heights,” Roch said.

Roch said the real super heroes are the graduates sitting on the stage before their families and friends. He said they are the ones who took one class a night while making sure the kids had something to eat. They are the ones who worked a full-time job and logged on for an hour each night, Roch said.

“The hard work you have endured and completed has made you more powerful than any super hero,” Roch said. “You are now a source of inspiration to your children, grandchildren, brothers, sisters to anyone who saw you keep going and never quit.”

Roch said for the graduates of the online program, “The sky is the limit and it is time for you to soar.”

Two hours later, the Pac Gym at Logan High School would be packed once again with family and friends of the 17 graduates of LHS’ class of 2015.

The graduation was held on Memorial Day weekend and class valedictorian Wyatt Strand asked everyone to take a moment to honor those who have served and are currently serving in the armed forces.

“It is because of you, those who bravely served, gave the ultimate sacrifice and those who currently serve that we are able to graduate this weekend,” Strand said.

“The greatest aspect we will ever share is our memories,” Strand said.

Strand said the hardest he has ever laughed as a Logan student occurred during his freshman year. He said in the middle of class, Larramy Roberts stood up and began reenacting a scene from “King Kong.” Roberts began acting like giant ape, jumping up on the desk making ape noises and swatting at imaginary planes.

Strand said it is memories like these that he and his classmates should remember as they continue their journey in life. He said while holding on to those memories is important, it is equally important to keep moving forward.

He said a quote from the film “Rocky” speaks to the need to move forward. In the movie, Rocky Balboa says: “It ain’t about how hard you hit. It’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward, how much you can take and keep moving forward. That’s how winning is done.”

Strand said he and his classmates have all been knocked down but nothing can ever keep them from getting back up and achieving their dreams.

“This is so exciting yet bittersweet,” said Logan graduate Destiny Bollin.

Bollin said everyone is ready to move to the next chapter in their lives and it makes her proud that all of her classmates have chosen to pursue higher education.

“This is our reward for all of our hard work,” said graduate Emily Collins.

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